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Whenever there is any doubt, there is no doubt

May 10, 2016 - 2 minutes read

Objectivity Blog 416 306
Piotr Torończak
Recently a Software Engineer in Support. SQL Server practitioner and former DBA. In Objectivity Blog I write about a Support life and problem solving techniques. Privately a guy with no passion, but many interests. A hiker, an MTB rider, a reader and jazz music aficionado.
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Making a professional decision based on a hunch recalls scenes from movies where action takes place in a casino with lots of flashing lights, huge bets taken and in the end - fortune wasted. It's double-true in IT support world. Should we leave a usage of instinct to animals then? Not necessary.

An effective decision making is based on two: facts and intuition. These two will make a powerful combo when used the right way. Intuition is no magic, I think it's rather something that evolves from experience and/or knowledge. Call it "I've seen it before" effect.  However, before you excuse your action with a gut shot, BACK IT WITH FACTS. Ask around, test, double-check with a colleague. You could be wrong as well.

In IT Support, a constant problem solving and a go/no-go decision making is a part of the job. As being ready for a worst to happen is a mantra, an intuition could be your good companion in spotting potential traps. Having a bad feeling about something? Check for facts.

Whenever there is any doubt, there is no doubt. Your intuition might see a combination of things and events that don't fit together very well and may result in a chain of unexpected and undesired results. The next time you think "I've got a bad feeling about this", there's no doubt you should stop and evaluate. You will probably be right.

PT

PS: This awesome leading thought from the title is not mine of course . Check for the movie "Ronin".

Piotr Torończak
Recently a Software Engineer in Support. SQL Server practitioner and former DBA. In Objectivity Blog I write about a Support life and problem solving techniques. Privately a guy with no passion, but many interests. A hiker, an MTB rider, a reader and jazz music aficionado.
See all Piotr's posts

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