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Ten to rule them all

Dec 3, 2015 - 1 minute read

Objectivity Blog 416 306
Piotr Torończak
Recently a Software Engineer in Support. SQL Server practitioner and former DBA. In Objectivity Blog I write about a Support life and problem solving techniques. Privately a guy with no passion, but many interests. A hiker, an MTB rider, a reader and jazz music aficionado.
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I could write an article on how to perform well in support, but telling an Administrator how to do things doesn’t tend to turn out well ("When is the Administrator right? Always kid, always").

However, in this business, sticking to a set of rules sounds like a good survival plan. Let me introduce you to mine, distilled from experience, blood, sweat and tears, and a bottle of fine Irish whiskey. They may appear commonsensical, but please note that common sense is not commonly practiced.

I believe my fellow support colleagues can easily relate. If you work anywhere else - please feel welcome to apply them in your own workplace.  No spoilers here.  

 

Ten Rules To Rule Them All

  1. Hope for the best, but prepare for the worst.
  2. You have to either know how to deal with that situation, or it deals with you.
  3. Back the heck baup!
  4. Do not breach an open door.
  5. Our failures are known, our successes - are not.
  6. Whenever there is any doubt, there is no doubt.
  7. Officiousness is worse than totalitarianism.
  8. If you go through hell - keep going. You don't want to get stuck there.
  9. Make sure before you get sure.
  10. Do not worry alone.
Dataops Ebook 416X300
Piotr Torończak
Recently a Software Engineer in Support. SQL Server practitioner and former DBA. In Objectivity Blog I write about a Support life and problem solving techniques. Privately a guy with no passion, but many interests. A hiker, an MTB rider, a reader and jazz music aficionado.
See all Piotr's posts

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